The Mold Survey consist of three components:

  • A visual inspection of the readily accessible areas of the home inside and outside to identify conditions that could be conducive to mold growth and to make recommendation to improve or correct theses conditions.

  • Identifying any apparent mold growth in the readily accessible areas of the home..

  • Recommendations for sampling in areas were apparent mold growth was visible or suspected to exist to verify the presents or absence of mold.

Mold Sampling included in our fee:

  • 1 indoor air quality sample

  • 1 outdoor air quality control sample

  • 1 additional air quality or physical sample

*Additional sampling can be performed for an additional fee. 

 

*All mold samples will be analyzed by an ESA certified lab

 

The Report:

  • PEACH Inspections will provide a comprehensive report, identifying moisture issues if any, along with recommendations for corrections and improvements.

  • The report will include the lab results indicating the presence or absence of mold.

  • We can also provide contact information for local contractors who can remediate mold if it is found.

Potential health effects and symptoms associated with mold exposures include allergic reactions, asthma and other respiratory complaints.

 

Mold needs two things to grow a food source and moisture. Many of the building materials a home is made of and many of the items in a home provide a good food source for mold growth. Therefore the limiting factor for mold growth in a home is moisture control.

Ten Things You Should Know about Mold

  1. Potential health effects and symptoms associated with mold exposures include allergic reactions, asthma and other respiratory complaints.
  2. There is no practical way to eliminate all mold and mold spores in the indoor environment; the way to control indoor mold growth is to control moisture.
  3. If mold is a problem in your home or school, you must clean up the mold and eliminate sources of moisture.
  4. Fix the source of the water problem or leak to prevent mold growth.
  5. Reduce indoor humidity (to 30-60%) to decrease mold growth by:
    • Venting bathrooms, dryers and other moisture-generating sources to the outside
    • Using air conditioners and de-humidifiers
    • Increasing ventilation
    • Using exhaust fans whenever cooking, dishwashing and cleaning
  6. Clean and dry any damp or wet building materials and furnishings within 24-48 hours to prevent mold growth.
  7. Clean mold off hard surfaces with water and detergent, and dry completely. Absorbent materials such as ceiling tiles, that are moldy, may need to be replaced.
  8. Prevent condensation: Reduce the potential for condensation on cold surfaces (i.e., windows, piping, exterior walls, roof, or floors) by adding insulation.
  9. In areas where there is a perpetual moisture problem, do not install carpeting (i.e., by drinking fountains, by classroom sinks, or on concrete floors with leaks or frequent condensation).
  10. Molds can be found almost anywhere; they can grow on virtually any substance, providing moisture is present. There are molds that can grow on wood, paper, carpet, and foods.

Mold and Health

How do molds affect people?

Molds are usually not a problem indoors, unless mold spores land on a wet or damp spot and begin growing. Molds have the potential to cause health problems. Molds produce allergens (substances that can cause allergic reactions) and irritants. Inhaling or touching mold or mold spores may cause allergic reactions in sensitive individuals. Allergic responses include hay fever-type symptoms, such as sneezing, runny nose, red eyes, and skin rash.

Allergic reactions to mold are common. They can be immediate or delayed. Molds can also cause asthma attacks in people with asthma who are allergic to mold. In addition, mold exposure can irritate the eyes, skin, nose, throat, and lungs of both mold-allergic and non-allergic people. Symptoms other than the allergic and irritant types are not commonly reported as a result of inhaling mold. Research on mold and health effects is ongoing.

The above does not describe all potential health effects related to mold exposure. For more detailed information consult a health professional, your state or local health department, or the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention mold website.

 

Basic Mold Cleanup

  • The key to mold control is moisture control.
  • It is important to dry water damaged areas and items within 24-48 hours to prevent mold growth.
  • If mold is a problem in your home, clean up the mold and get rid of the excess water or moisture.
  • Fix leaky plumbing or other sources of water.
  • Wash mold off hard surfaces with detergent and water, and dry completely. Absorbent materials (such as ceiling tiles & carpet) that become moldy may have to be replaced.